National Eczema Society promotes trials and projects that the charity believes have the potential to make a significant difference to the lives of people with eczema. Here are some examples of trials we have supported, promoted or featured in our members’ magazine, Exchange.

ALPHA trial

The ALPHA trial compares Alitretinoin and PUVA therapy in patients aged 18 years and over with severe hand eczema which is not controlled on a daily (regular) basis with prescription steroid creams. The purpose of the ALPHA research study is to find out the most effective treatment for chronic hand eczema.

A-STAR study

The UK-Irish Atopic Eczema Systemic Therapy Register (A-STAR) study aims to establish how well systemic medicines work with regard to improvement in disease severity, quality of life and also safety, especially when these medicines are used for longer periods of time.

BIOMAP

This exciting internationa lresearch initiative takes advantage of recent technical developments in translational medicine, to drive drug discovery and improve direct disease management in atopic eczema and psoriasis.

ECO study

The Eczema Care Online (ECO) research study aims to promote effective eczema self-care by improving individuals’ knowledge of eczema treatments and influencing attitudes, skills, and habits related to treatment use.

Fractures and eczema

A mjor new study by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine has found a link between eczema and bone fractures.

Infections and eczema

Consultant Dermatologist Susannah George and patient representative Anjna Rani share findings from the latest Cochrane research review on treatments used to reduce infection with the bacteria Staphylococcus Aureus in people with eczema. They examine the evidence for what treatments really works for infected eczema?

SOFTER trial

The Softened Water for Eczema Prevention (SOFTER) trial is investigating whether using water softeners can reduce the risk of eczema in babies. The trial is being conducted at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London. The research builds on earlier findings showing that hard water damages the skin’s protective barrier and could contribute to the development of eczema.

TEST trial

Parents are often concerned that food allergies may be causing their child’s eczema, although this is often not the case. Yet uncertainty surrounds the role of diet in managing eczema. The TEST trial is looking to see how useful it is to do routine food allergy tests in children with eczema.